Storm damage

We had some wild weather last week, with high winds and rain. Today is fine, sunny and windless and I finally got outside to assess the damage. A tamarillo has  bitten the dust :

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A huge Swamp Gum down the back has lost a main branch, which is still attached and hooked up on other trees. I’ll be keeping away from underneath this one until it decides to fall all the way :

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This was the major damage. The rest consisted of small branches and twigs everywhere, out of which I got four useful barrowloads of mulched gum leaves.

 

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7 Responses to “Storm damage”

  1. notsomethingelse Says:

    Sad, but I reckon there is a good chance for your Tamarillo to recover from that. A neat cut-off below the break …and Spring isn’t far away.

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    • foodnstuff Says:

      Tamarillos are good at that. I wanted to deliberately remove one once and sawed it off at the base. It sprouted again, so I removed the sprouts. It did it a third time, at which I gave up and let it be. Can’t argue with Mother Nature!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. narf7 Says:

    We have given up trying to do anything around here till this spate of bad weather gives up the ghost. No point anyway when you sink up to your armpits in mud. How very different from the summer we just had and a lot of trees that suffered badly from the extremely dry conditions we had are now falling over due to nothing to hold onto any more. I guess the positive side is that we have a LOT of firewood for the next year or so. Sorry about your tamarillo. Are they hard to grow from seed? I found a fruit on the side of the road and thought I might give it a go. Do you know if you can grow pepino from seed by the way as I saved some.

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    • foodnstuff Says:

      Tamarillos grow easily from seed, much more so than cuttings and the germination rate is usually very good. I have grown pepinos from seed, just to try it out, but they’re so easy from cuttings that I wouldn’t bother with seed, unless I wanted the diversity in the seedlings to see if I could get a new and better variety. Just make sure the fruits are ripe before you extract the seed and I usually let it ferment the same way as I do with tomato seed.

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  3. Chris Says:

    We didn’t have the bad weather you do (ours tends to arrive in summer) but the weather has been overcast and drizzly. It has only just recently cleared up for us too.

    I’m glad it was such a low number of losses. The persimmon would have been harder to lose. At least you could spare the Tamarillo, as you have many of those. Though by the sounds of it, it could bounce back.

    I just wanted to share the merits of such things happening however, as the cycle which benefits the Australian landscape. In a dry and brittle summer, the winds take out the deadwood. When the rains arrive again, the deadwood gets washed downstream to (hopefully) get stuck and create a leaky dam. An increase in moisture by holding the waters back, reduces the damage caused by the next dry and brittle summer.

    As much as I hate seeing things being lost in people’s gardens, it reminds me, nature ultimately has a plan. 🙂

    Glad you’re safe.

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    • foodnstuff Says:

      Thanks Chris. Sometimes nature’s plans and mine don’t quite coincide, although I’m learning more and more to let her have her way. Think it’s because I’m getting too old to argue with her. LOL!

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